Friday, December 15, 2017

Terre Hill Mennonite High School Christmas Program


The Terre Hill Mennonite High School Christmas Program will be held this weekend,
Saturday, Dec. 16th, and Sun. Dec. 17th, at 7 p.m.
1416 Union Grove Rd, Terre Hill, PA 17581
Everyone is invited!


THMH Christmas Program
Chorus

Once in Royal David’s City (Ireland)...................................Alexander/Gauntlett
Soloists: Juliya Burkholder (Saturday), Annie Martin (Sunday)
Bring a Torch Jeanette, Isabella (France)........................................Parker/Shaw
Infant Holy, Infant Lowly (Poland)........................................Reed/Psalter Hymnal

Sight Singing Classes Ensemble

For Me To Live Is Christ …………………….............................……..Larry Nickel
What Child Is This…………………....................…………….……..Dix/Traditional

Gospel Team

Carol of the Bells (Ukraine) ……….............................…...Wilhousky/Leontovich
Silent Night (Austria)...........................Traditional/Kaplan/Olusola/Bram/Emerson
Danke Shon (America)....................................................................Lyle Stutzman
In the Bleak Midwinter (England)......................................................Gustav Holst

THMH Men

Oba Se Je (Here Comes the King!) (Nigeria)..........................Christopher Aspass
Soloists: Joseph Burkholder, Austin Gehman, Jeff Martin, Sheldon Beiler

Intermission

THMH Ladies

Will the Circle Be Unbroken (Traditional Appalachian)................Winter/Rose/Taylor
Trio: Briana Stoltzfus, Adrienne Gehman, Chelsey Horning (Saturday)
      Ariana Rutt, Adrienne Gehman, Mary Swanson (Sunday)

Gospel Team

Riu, Riu, Chiu (Spain)..................................Mateo Flecha the Elder/Greenberg
Soloists:  Austin Gehman, Jason Beiler
I Wonder as I Wander (American South)..........................................John Rutter
Soloist:  Mary Swanson
Feliz Navidad (Mexico)..................................................Feliciano/Dinzey/Manon

Chorus

Lo Ere a Rose (Germany).........................................................Michael Praetorius
Rocking Carol (Czechoslovakia) ……………….............…………...John Kingsbury
Angels We Have Heard on High (France) ……………………………..Lyle Stutzman
Hallelujah Chorus (England/Germany)...............................George Frederic Handel


Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Marvelous Maps

   As we studied European colonization of the New World the past two weeks, we focused mainly on South America, as the entire next year will be spent on North America.  For their project for this chapter, I asked them to make a map of South America, and told them that it needed to include all the countries (labeled, of course).  I gave them several ideas, found a huge printable maps here, printed out whatever sizes they wanted, and gave them some time to work on them in class.  Then I waited to see what would arrive in my classroom on Friday.  
(I NEVER have an assignment due on Monday.  It ruins family time over the weekend. I am a mom, too.  :-)


These are puzzles.  






We remembered the Treaty of Tordesillas by calling it the "Treaty of Tortilla".  No one missed that on the test, even though I spelled it correctly :-).  And, the Spanish pope did draw the original Line of Demarcation there, giving Portugal a tiny portion, and the rest of South America to the Spanish. 

  








  













































































Saturday, December 9, 2017

Angels We Have Heard on High Flash Mob

We spent last weekend working on a recording project for Blue Sky Music.  After a long day of recording, we headed over to the Shady Maple Buffet for a few flash mobs.  Thanks to Myron Eby for catching it all on video, and doing some fine editing as well.   

The arrangements of "Joy Medley" and "Angels We Have Heard on High" are both available at Blue Sky Music's link above.  

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Silly Stories and Secret Codes for Spelling



It is after 10:00 p.m., and I just finished grading the 6th graders' spelling and vocabulary tests.  I was thrilled with their grades which ranged from a 91 to six 100s.  WOW!   When the lowest grade in the class is in the nineties, I know that something worked and I begin analyzing, and here is what I've figured out that has worked with this class over the past few months.  I believe that any teacher could use these techniques and see marked improvement in their class's spelling grades.  (These pictures are all from the students' last spelling tests.)
1.  Finding words within words, drawing pictures, and telling silly stories really help them learn "tricks" which enable them to spell the words correctly.  
Examples from above:  
"prayer" is the root of "prayerful",
"spectacles" begins the same way as "specify",
"flu" is in the middle of the word "affluent",  
"point" is at the end of "disappoint",
"Ana" sat on a "log",
and it is a shame to have a house repossessed for only owing $4.00 (the four "s"s make the $4.00).

NOW, I NEVER say these stories or reminders during the real test, and I will rarely say them during even a practice test.  We just practice them that way in class, and I explain them that way, and the students remember them when it is time for the test.

Certain students remember different things, so I usually show them a few different ways.  What works for one student may not work for another, but one of the ways I show them usually will work with their brains and they will remember.  
This student remembered that an Indian had "grat-i-tude" and did "spec-i-fy" (thus the "i" in the middle); and that made sense to her.  She also used my silly sentence for "analogy" -- "Ana has a log, why?" to remind her of the "y" at the end.

And here is the other column on the test.  Balaam's "ass" did make "sure" that Balaam wasn't hurt by the angel.  Besides using the "I am an electrician" sentence (i - an) which helped them learn the last three letters of this one, they then missed the "tri" in the middle.  So I told them my electrician showed up at my house on a tricycle.  We laughed, and they remembered it for the test the next day even though I didn't review it with them.  
And, when you disembark from a ship, the captain will give you one M&M.  (Several of them were spelling it "disenbark".
I also told them that someone could "die" if they were disobedient, and that there is a "rope" in "European".

2.  Secret codes really work.  We were having an awful time with our vocabulary words.  First I made a slide show with pictures of each vocabulary word along with the definition.  I also printed these out on a sheet of paper for them. This helped a lot. Here is an example of one.  

dehydrate - to remove water from

But the problem was that the tests aren't always matching the vocabulary word with the definition.  Sometimes just the definition is there and they have to pull the word out of their heads.  Often much of the class had problems doing this, so two weeks ago I began using the secret code method.  

Here is the secret code from this last test.  
No A, 1 B, 2 C, 2 De, 2 F, no G, HI, MP3, RR (railroad)
Once they memorized the secret code (which only took about two days) they could easily recall all of the vocabulary words.  They asked me if they could write the secret code on their tests from memory.  Of course, I said "yes".  They asked if that was cheating.  I told them that if they memorized the secret code and all the vocabulary words and wrote the entire list from memory (without any prompts, hints, visual helps or reviews before the test from me at all), that that was called studying, not cheating.  
The entire class got every single one of these correct on this last test.  It has worked so well we're on our third secret code.  The students think it is fun and it certainly helps their grades. 
3.  I've also learned that if the students are expected to memorize the Greek and Latin roots, (thanks for really pushing the 6th graders, Abeka) then secret codes work for those, too.  And I know it works because several of the students easily remembered this one also and wrote it from memory on their tests.  And I don't do those "quick reviews" right before the tests either.  I expect them to remember it on their own from the days before. 

Here is how this one worked.  We had a  "FGHI mit".  

"F" was for "flu", "g" was for "grat", "h" was for "hydro", "i" was for "inter", and "mit" was for "mit", obviously.

If any of you are using the 6th grade Abeka curriculum for spelling and vocabulary, I will gladly share my vocabulary slides (pictures) and secret codes with you if you are interested.   My email address is littleflock7 at gmail dot com.   


















Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Sidewalk Chalk and a Fun Song

The kindergarten class was having fun using sidewalk chalk last week.  I was having fun enjoying their creativity.  I think we should all do something like this every little once in awhile.  



They did some funny letter-math-stuff, too.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

The 17 Rep List

This weekend The 17 will present a concert of Lyle Stutzman's compositions and arrangements, conducted by Lyle himself.  The repertoire will consist of songs from the above list.  If there is one you'd really like to hear, please let us know.  

Sunday, December 3rd at 2:00 p.m.
Calvary Mennonite Fellowship
280 Pleasant Valley Rd.
East Earl, PA  17519

For more information visit Blue Sky Music's website 

Sunday, November 26, 2017

Happy Journal Coloring!



I've been telling my students that they MUST use color on their Wednesday "Encyclopedia Day" journal entries, and some of the results have been lovely -- especially if I give them an extra minute or two.  This brief exercise, which we usually perform each Wednesday during the few minutes of English class, has many benefits.
* The students are quiet and get to work immediately.
* They are using their brains in a different way which increases creativity, spacial awareness, and perspective.
* Their knowledge of science and history is broadened; just about everything in any encyclopedia is one of those two.
* It causes them to enjoy their journal time even more.
* Because of all of the above, it makes them better writers.

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Geodesic Domes - Project Based Learning






















We were studying Renaissance architecture as part of our world history class, and I was absolutely intrigued with Brunelleschi's Dome which sits on top of the Cathedral of Florence in Italy. Completed in 1436, it is still the largest masonry dome in the world.  Engineers to this day are not sure how it was built, though there are several theories.  

 
I have begun to delve a little more into project based learning, and I thought that making geodesic domes would be an interesting study in math, history, and architecture.  The students completed these in a little over an hour using just newspapers, tape, staples, and the instructions I found online here.  
  

  I was hoping that the completed domes would be large enough for a student or two to actually get inside them, but all eight gentlemen and almost all the girls fit inside their respective domes.  
And of course, the ladies weren't allowed inside the guys' dome. 

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Khan You Believe We Had a Mongolian Party?


Besides the fact that I had my camera on the wrong setting all evening (argh-[and that's the official pirate spelling, thank you]) we had a fabulously fun Mongolian Genghis Khan Achievement Party. (We had studied the ancient Mongolians a few weeks ago.)
The furry invitations were placed on their desks earlier in the week.

 
The day before the party, four of the teachers were in the kitchen preparing a delightful menu of authentic, Mongolian recipes.  The downstairs of the school still smells amazing a few days later.
   Menu:  
Buuz
Guuriltai shul
Khuushuur
Boortsog
Suutei tsai

Dumplings filled with beef: Buuz

Vegetable and chicken soup: guriltai shul

Beef and chicken filled fried pockets: khuushuur

Mean, Mongolian cooks

Donut/cookies: Boortsog
These yummy, fried donuts were served Mongolian-style, stacked upon a cake plate with candles on top. 

   
Creamy tea with milk: Suutei tsai


After school the students met Genghis Khan (Mr. Swanson) in the stairwell where he gave them envelopes.  The envelopes informed them which teams they were on, and what they were to do first: put on their robes or long shirts and winter hats (which their invitations instructed them to bring), and Mongolian sashes (which I had cut out earlier and provided for them.)  

  The teams were named as follows:  Genghis Khan, Kublai Khan, Marco Polo, Chepe Noyon, and Temujin.  Next they were told to go outside and find five Mongolian coins and a Mongolian sheep bone hidden in the bushes around the school.  

     
After that they ran downstairs and played Mongolian morra, a finger-counting game.  Then they ran upstairs to play Khan Curling, a game in which they slid bean-filled socks down the hall trying to get one to land on the Khan's nose.  Next they were given duct tape by our principal to practice yurt-sitting.  The team with the most points received a small prize.

Then all the teams met downstairs while Genghis did some Mongolian throat singing for them.  Really.

Then we all headed out beyond the soccer field where we had built a yurt the day before after school.  Several of my eighth graders from last year, who are now ninth graders, assisted us in making the yurt, and they were amazing.  They also dressed up and helped us serve at the party. 

The yurt

Snugly inside the yurt, we enjoyed that fabulous Mongolian menu, sang songs, told stories, played a game, and laughed a lot.  Two spies stole the khan's cup, which we retrieved and then witnessed to the spies, hoping they would become khan-verts.  We played kahn-fusion in which we had to khan-centrate.  We decided that we did not live in Khan-sas, Khan-necticut, or Khanada; but that we liked Khan-verse tennis shoes.  
We were going to go outside and look at the Mongolian khan-stellations, but it was too cloudy.  (Yes, we milked the whole "khan" thing quite a bit.  The students were really into it. ) 





We left the yurt up until the next day so that the other grades could go inside it.  During the last hour of the day, which was a study hall, most of the seventh and eighth graders went out into the wind and cold and helped us take down our yurt.